Be Prepared For Emergencies | Scouts Volunteers Helping their Communities | #GlobalScouts | International Volunteers Day

#ScoutVolunteers train #Scouts to #BePreparedForEmergencies #OutdoorsLearning for real emergencies. ==> #Repost @worldscouting

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When natural disaster struck be it in Mexico, Sri Lanka, Haiti, Ecuador, or the Philippines and humanitarian response was needed, #Scouts were among the #VolunteersActFirst to help the community.

Scouts from BSA Troop 182 in Jacksonville, Florida collected donations for Hurricane Maria’s victims in Puerto Rico. Scouts in Puerto Rico also helped in disaster relief after hurricane destroyed the island.

#ScoutVolunteers teach #Scouts to #BePreparedForEmergencies.

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Four Weeks Later (Irma & the Keys) | Rusty Gardner | Florida By Water

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Many of you have asked about the Keys and how they are doing after Hurricane Irma. It has now been a little over four weeks since the storm made landfall at Cudjoe Key. On October 2nd, the Florida Keys and Key West officially reopened their doors to tourists. This past weekend, we took a look for ourselves to see how this tropical paradise is faring.

The areas from Marathon through Big Pine Key were hit hard. Mobile home parks and campground are now pretty much gone. Relief efforts are scattered throughout the area, and in many places, the landscape looks more like a war zone than a lush tropical island. Trash and debris line the roadways, piled as high as 20 feet in certain areas. Metal objects like washing machines and dryers are separated from yard trash and building materials. There is no doubt that this storm will provide a Darwinist approach to housing construction in the area — survival of the fittest. I assume that that the middle keys will evolve and become stronger because of the storm and that the less than desirable housing will eventually vanish. However, I do think it will be some time before this becomes evident.

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One thing I was not expecting was the lack of greenery. The shrubs that line most of US 1 are leafless as a result of the high winds, giving the small trees a dormant appearance. On the plus side, major businesses like banks, grocery stores, and gas stations are open. Roads are clear, and traffic flows freely despite the massive lines of dump trucks tasked with removing the trash from the islands. I did find it interesting to note that buildings with thatched roofs, mostly tiki bars, seemed to fare just fine.

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The north and south end of the island chain, Key West, and Key Largo are okay as well. Honestly, in Key West, if it weren’t for a little debris on the side streets, I would have never known there was a storm. Cruise ships are docking daily, filling the streets with the tourists that the economy so desires and needs. Duval Street and its bars are packed in true Key West fashion. Parasailing, jet skis, scooter rentals, and fishing charters are all open and active. At the end of the day, everyone gathers a Mallory Square for the sunset, just like they’ve done for years.

So if you’re thinking about a visiting Key West and the Florida Keys, now is a great time to visit. Go ahead and plan a trip. You may find a few inconveniences, but overall you’ll be surprised at how resilient the islands are. Just remember to tip a little more than usual. They’ve had a tough few weeks, and your support will be much appreciated.

 

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Rusty Gardner 10-8-2017

Reposted from his Facebook post. Visit Florida By Water website.

Seven graphics that sum up Puerto Rico disaster | BBC News

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Many people have been asking about what is happening in the island. This British report summarizes the current situation with pragmatic figures. #PuertoRicoStrong

via Seven graphics that sum up Puerto Rico disaster – BBC News

Mobile Devices and Social Media: Instant News and Knowledge | Dr. Jose G. Lepervanche | #CitizenReporters

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#CitizensReporters have been using #MobileDevices and #SocialMedia to share instant news, videos, texts, and pictures during times of crisis. We have seen political demonstrations, elections, events, disasters, and many more cases. We have in our hands a powerful computer, communicator, and camera to share and connect with family and friends. We also use these technologies to access #InstantKnowledge about the events, stories, and background information. We are more connected to our mobile devices but also using them to be more connected to people.

#HurricaneMaria and #EarthquakeMexico2017 are recent examples about the use of mobile technologies and smartphone apps to send emergency messages, find relatives, share videos and pictures that later are shown in traditional TV channels.

The issue is to avoid censorship, hacking, fake news, and disruption of the signal. People in Puerto Rico are struggling to communicate and share that they are safe. These are small examples of the increasing dependence of technologies and energy. The bottom line is to know what are we learning during emergencies. We continue with our adapted #Scouting mottos: #BePreparedForemergencies, #BePreparedToChange.

What are we learning about the use of social media and mobile devices?

Here is the report and pictures from Alan Taylor | The Atlantic:
Disconnected by Disaster—Photos From a Battered Puerto Rico

Here is our CNN iReport about the use of mobile technologies during another crisis.
#CitizensReporters 2013
CNN iReport: Venezuelan Elections in New Orleans | #CitizenReporters

2013 CNN iReport JGL Reporter2013 JGL iReport CNN Cellular

Disconnected by Disaster—Photos From a Battered Puerto Rico | Alan Taylor | The Atlantic

Watch the outdoors in #PuertoRico after #HurricaneMaria #DisasterRecovery lessons. #Connected to learn about it. Disconnected by Disaster—Photos From a Battered Puerto Rico | Alan Taylor | The Atlantic #CrossSharing

Jacksonville went back to normal after Hurricane Irma.

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Jacksonville went back to normal after Hurricane Irma. We observed cargo ships, fishing boats, and sport boats using St Johns River to connect the city to the sea.  Lessons after the storm. Recovering is a task of all our community and visitors.

One week after Hurricane Irma crossed Florida from the Keys to Jacksonville, Florida, we collected several lessons to be used in our Management courses.

Here are the points that we are covering in our courses:

  • Emergency Preparedness #GlobalManagement
  • Weather Data Analysis #GlobalSystems
  • City Leaders During Storms #GlobalLeadership

We continue these lessons after Hurricane Maria and Mexico earthquake. Be prepared for emergencies.